Egypt wins World Karate Federation Premier League

The winner of this year’s World Karate Federation Premier League is Egypt.

The competition was held in Sharm El-Sheikh. The competition was held under the aegis of Al-Ahram org and was supported by Ibrahim Mehleb, the prime minister of Egypt. Egypt was the overall winner and Turkey and UAE got the second and third place respectively. Egypt won six gold medals and thirteen bronze and four silver medals. Turkey was able to get five gold medals and four bronze and three silver medals. UAE managed to get two gold medals and one bronze medal.

38 countries took part in this competition and the total number of individual participants was 464. It was for the first time that this competition was held in one of the Arabian countries and the vice president of the national Karate federation of Egypt, Mohieddin Ahmed who is also the organising committee’s head, has said that it was an honour for his country to be able to play host to this competition. This competition takes place eight times in one year. Read more »

Karate Might Soon Be A Part Of Olympics 2020

The Japan national Press club in Tokyo held a press conference where the president of World Karate federation, Antonio Espinos was witnessed speaking his views and thoughts. There have been a great enthusiasm and push to make Karate a part of the Tokyo Olympics that is scheduled to be for 2020.

There have been made reforms by the IOC which has shown karate officials a silver lining. Stronger hopes and faith is being made that martial art could be added to the Tokyo games. The two parties- 2020 organizers and the world karate Federation are meeting together, so that the case for supporting karate can be put forth. Antonio, the president of the world karate Federation has said that Karate is a sport that is strongly significant for Japanese and has been based on its roots. Read more »

Karate – Best Self Defence

Karate is practiced as an art, as sport, as a combat sport, or as self defense training. Traditionally karate gives more emphasis on self-development while the modern Japanese style gives more importance on the psychological elements incorporated into a proper kokoro (attitude) such as perseverance, fearlessness, virtue, and leadership skills.

The training of the sport commonly consists of kihon (basics or fundamentals), kata (forms), and kumite (sparring). Different styles give varying importance on kihon. Typically this is performance in unison of a technique or a combination of techniques by a group of karateka. Kihon may also be prearranged drills in smaller groups or in pairs.

Kata means literally “shape” or “model.” Kata is a formalized sequence of movements which represent various offensive and defensive postures. These postures are based on idealized combat applications. The applications when applied in a demonstration with real opponents are referred to as a Bunkai. The Bunkai shows how every stance and movement is used. Bunkai is a useful tool to understand a kata. To achieve a formal rank the karateka must show competent performance of specific required kata for that level.

Sparring in Karate is called kumite. It literally means “meeting of hands.” Kumite is practiced both as a sport and as self-defense training. Levels of physical contact during sparring vary considerably. Knockdown karate (such as Kyokushin) uses full power techniques to bring an opponent to the ground. In kickboxing variants the preferred win is by knockout. Sparring in armour, bogu kumite, allows full power techniques with some safety.

In structured kumite (yakusoku, prearranged), two participants perform a choreographed series of techniques with one striking while the other blocks. In free sparring (Jiyu Kumite), the two participants have a free choice of scoring techniques. The allowed techniques and contact level are primarily determined by sport or style organization policy, but might be modified according to the age, rank and sex of the participants.

Free sparring in karate is performed in a marked or closed area and in light contact or semi contact kumite, points are awarded based on the criteria: good form, sporting attitude, vigorous application, awareness/zanshin, good timing and correct distance. In full contact karate kumite, points are based on the results of the impact, rather than the formal appearance of the scoring technique.